Our native wildflowers - page 8

Tall boneset
(Eupatorium altissimum)
 ©Janet Allen Late boneset

We dug up a small plant of this at a gas station as we were traveling through Pennsylvania in late September. (We don't dig plants from the wild, but this was growing along a gas station parking area, so it was at risk anyway.) I was interested in it because it was so attractive to monarchs as they were passing through. The small plant survived and thrived. It is indeed late-flowering, just starting to flower in mid-September.

** SPECIAL VALUE TO NATIVE BEES **
** SUPPORTS CONSERVATION BIOLOGICAL CONTROL **
More info from Wildflower Center

Ageratum
(Eupatorium coelestinum)
 ©Janet Allen Ageratum

This is the first year I've grown this. I like it so far. One mistake I made was to plant it behind a much taller plant. I'll either pull out the larger plant or transplant this one.

Wildlife: Bees, butterflies
** SPECIAL VALUE TO NATIVE BEES **
** SUPPORTS CONSERVATION BIOLOGICAL CONTROL **
More info from Wildflower Center (aka Conoclinium coelestinum)

Joe-pye Weed
(Eupatorium -which kind?)
 ©Janet Allen Joe-pye weed

These are very tall plants, but I've begun to cut some of them back rather severely in late June to limit their ultimate height and make them bushier. It also delays the flowering, which prolongs the amount of time when I have fresh joe-pye flowers, which are a favorite nectar source for bees and butterflies.

Common boneset
(Eupatorium perfoliatum)
 ©Janet Allen Boneset

This is an example of a botanical name providing a clue to the plant (or vice versa, I suppose). The species name "perfoliatum" means "through the leaf." If you look closely, you can see that the stem looks like it's going right through the leaf. The common name "boneset" refers to the use of boneset to set bones. This was done because of the "Doctrine of Signatures." This doctrine said that what plants looked like indicated what it should be used for—in this case, setting bones so they would be joined together as the leaves are.

Wildlife: Birds, butterflies
** SPECIAL VALUE TO NATIVE BEES **
** SUPPORTS CONSERVATION BIOLOGICAL CONTROL **
More info from Wildflower Center

White snakeroot
(Eupatorium rugosum)
 ©Janet Allen Snakeroot

One of the eupatoriums—one that really sparkles in the shade. It spreads itself around a bit, but not so much to become a nuisance.

** SUPPORTS CONSERVATION BIOLOGICAL CONTROL **
More info from Wildflower Center (aka Agertina altissima)

Flowering spurge
(Euphorbia corollata)
 ©Janet Allen Flowering spurge

Flowering spurge is one of my favorites. This native is much nicer than baby's breath I think.

** SUPPORTS CONSERVATION BIOLOGICAL CONTROL **
More info from Wildflower Center

Flowering spurge
(Euphorbia corollata)
 ©Janet Allen Flowering spurge

Like flowering dogwood, it's the bracts that we think of as the flower, not the actual flowers. And since the bracts last much longer than flowers, this cloud of white "blooms" remains for quite a long time.

Queen of the Prairie
(Filipendula rubra)
 ©Janet Allen Queen of the prairie

Beautiful color. I haven't found the right spot for it yet. I've moved it a few times, and even though it's a big plant, it seems to get overrun by more aggressive plants. I hope I have it in a place where it can thrive now.

Wildlife: Butterflies
More info from Wildflower Center

Wintergreen
(Gaultheria procumbens)
 ©Janet Allen Wintergreen

We just planted this in 2013. I've tried it before, and it died. This time I put a lot of our wonderful leaf humus in the planting hole, so I hope it thrives. Cullina notes that it's one of the few plants that relish dry shade. It's also an evergreen groundcover. No wildlife value I guess, though Cullina says he pops the berries into his mouth for the minty taste.

Deer resistance: rarely damaged